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Monday, November 17, 2008

Barack And Curtis By Byron Hurt


My husband sent this clip to me and I was fascinated and repelled. Very thought provoking and provocative comparison of two different men. What do you think?
I'm copying and pasting underneath part of the director's comments. His link is Byron

Director's Statement
BARACK & CURTIS: MANHOOD, POWER, AND RESPECT

September 16, 2008

...I am proud to be a part of the Black Masculinity Project, a project of the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC). Like many other filmmakers who applied for this, I was required to submit to them three ideas for a short documentary (10 minutes or less) that examined various aspects of black masculinity. Of the three ideas I had, NBPC chose the one that was actually a last minute idea.
...I hope you'll watch Barack & Curtis online and then forward everywhere. Help spread the word by posting it to your blogs, social networking sites, websites, and listservs. Talk about it with your friends, co-workers, and family.
...One final note: Barack & Curtis is in no way intended to create a negative association between Barack Obama and 50 Cent. Anyone who would suggest that mis-understands what my piece is all about. Furthermore, anyone who uses Barack & Curtis to smear Barack Obama in any way, is either ignorant, or morally bankrupt. In no way do I want to damage Barack Obama's historic presidential campaign. In no way am I suggesting that Barack Obama is down with G-Unit or is a gangsta rapper cleverly disguised as a presidential candidate. Neither is Barack & Curtis intended to glorify 50 Cent. Instead, the piece is my attempt to humanize 50 Cent, examine two very different Black men who express their masculinity in two very different ways, and who took two very different paths to achieve manhood, power, and respect.

In the end, I hope Barack & Curtis spreads all over the world over the Internet, igniting a powerful online conversation about Barack Obama, 50 Cent, and the range of black masculinity in between.

God bless,

B. Hurt
www.bhurt.com

2 comments:

3girlsmomma said...

I heard about this on the local National Public Radio station in my area. I thought it was well said. As an educator, I have too often witnessed the intelligent well-meaning black male succumb to "dumbing down" his cognitive ability or resorting to an appearance of bravado that is NOT who he is just to receive general acceptance among other males-- and FEMALES in some cases.

Don't get me wrong... I happen to recognize how strong-minded and strong-willed a male has to be to really be STREET SMART. Street-smart qualities in and of themselves are admirable. So, I'm all over the idea of the intelligent, strong images of black manhood, power, and respect.

It is possible to balance the Barack & Curtis continuum. We are a what I like to call a “bi-lingual people” anyway. We LIVE “playin’ the roles” of assimilation and being real constantly. The black man can clearly be the responsible "rough-neck street-wise black male" AND AT THE SAME TIME be "smart, powerful and respected businessman" with degrees/or not-- and money which is the equalizer these days. (I just want him to be on the RIGHT side of the law in his “business.”) Truly, a responsible, strong, gentlemanly seamless expression of both IS my attraction in black masculinity.

Meikmeika said...

Amba,

I know this doesn't belong here but here's the falafel recipe I used. The only difference is I baked mine at 375 degrees until browned nicely.

* 16 oz. can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans.
* 1 large onion, chopped
* 2 cloves of garlic, chopped
* 3 tablespoons of fresh parsley, chopped
* 1 teaspoon coriander
* 1 teaspoon cumin
* 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
* Salt
* Pepper
* Oil for frying



Combine chickpeas, garlic, onion, coriander, cumin, salt and pepper (to taste) in medium bowl. Add baking powder.

Mash chickpeas, ensuring to mix ingredients together. You can also combine ingredients in a food processor. You want the result to be a thick paste.

Form the mixture into small balls, about the size of a ping pong ball. Slightly flatten.

Fry in 2 inches of oil until golden brown (5-7 minutes).